BIPOC

LAND & HEALING

IMG_1540.jpg

NURTURING

INDIGENOUS AND BIPOC WELLBEING

& CONNECTION WITH LAND

IN RESPONSE TO COMMUNITY NEED

98% of rural farmland in the United States is owned by White families. In comparison, 77% of land is worked by Indigenous, Latinx and people of color.

It is of absolute importance that LAND become accessible to BIPOC and the people who tend it, and with the land also the natural resources of clean air, clean water, agriculture, space use and nature's healing.

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the particular vulnerability of queer, transgender, non-binary and/or intersex Black, Indigenous folks and other LGBTQIA+ people of color (QTIBIPOC folks). Due to our community disproportionately experiencing a lifelong arc of violence and discrimination, many of our community members are impoverished and housing unstable.

Within the United States, LGBTQ comprise 40% of homeless youth though they only make up 7% of the population.

Food insecurity also disproportionately affects marginalized communites. One in seven Americans go to bed hungry at night.

 

Identity impacts access to food and money; people of color are disproportionately affected by hunger. 22.5% of Black households and 18.5% of Latinx/Hispanic households experienced food insecurity in 2018. Additionally, 29% of sufferers of food insecurity are queer people.

 

The best way to address hunger and homelessness is to feed and house people. When QTBIPOC people are fed and housed, they are more able to heal and engage fully with their lives.

 

This is the reason for NATIVEWOMANSHARE's focus on food sovereignty, community and belonging.

LAND IS POWER.

SUBSISTENCE IS RESISTANCE.

Nestled in the hills of Southern Oregon, NATIVEWOMANSHARE holds space for Indigenous women,

two-spirit and other women of color to reunite with the land

and their own healing

through residency, retreats, the reclamation of heritage art and culture,

indigenous land stewardship,

ritual, ceremony and intergenerational learning.

HEALING INCLUDES:

FOOD SOVEREIGNTY is the right to healthy, abundant and culturally appropriate foods

and medicines through ecologically sound methods

TRADITIONAL INDIGENOUS FOODWAYS bring flora & fauna back to the land

SAFESPACE to live, come together, unite with other BIPOC and thrive

ART, CULTURE, NATURE CONNECTION, STORYTELLING, DECOLONIZING WORKSHOPS, RETREATS, TRADITIONAL MEDICINE, RITUAL & CEREMONY, COMMUNITY BELONGING